Black Catholicism: Forthcoming New Book by Madeleine LeDespencer on Abbé Boullan and French Diabolism

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(Author and witch Madeleine Le Despencer)

Because I like plugging others’ work as well as my own on this blog, I thought I would share the recent announcement of a forthcoming new book by my favourite Catholic witch Madeleine Le Despencer.

Madeleine’s book Le Catholicisme Noire: The Devotional Blasphemies of Abbé Joseph-Antoine Boullan, which will be published by Three Hands Press towards the end of this year, deals with the life and practices of Abbé Boullan, a 19th century defrocked Roman Catholic priest and Luciferian Gnostic mystic who was accused of Satanism and generated considerable scandal in the occult scenes of fin de siecle France. Continue reading

Economies of Curiosity: The Dalai Lama’s email inbox, the Foreign Researcher in Mcleod Ganj and Artaud Syndrome

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(Antonin Artaud, gazing upon the summit of interiority)

So, McLeod Ganj, India where I am living, ‘Little Lhasa’, or the Tibetan capital in exile, is a funny kind of place. It’s really only a very small town, but its few streets and rural mountain town feel belies its cosmopolitanism. It is a junction point for a virtually unceasing stream of Tibetan and foreign visitors, for news and information from all over the globe. Besides formal support from the Tibetan government in exile, and informal flows of money from friends and family – everything from transnational remittances, informal/illegal trade, community saving unions, personal support structures centered around people from the same home regions in Tibet and exile, from common Tibetan exile or Indian school graduating groups, or shared monastic colleges – many Tibetans rely on tourist dollars to survive.

I have often said that this town exists for better or worse in the midst of overlapping economies of curiosity. Romantic stereotypes and Tibetans’ global reputation precedes them. One silver lining about this curiosity or global gaze is that it can at least be turned into a source of continued survival and livelihood for exile Tibetans, who let it not be forgotten, remain by and large stateless refugees living deeply precarious lives.

Continue reading