Black Catholicism: Forthcoming New Book by Madeleine LeDespencer on Abbé Boullan and French Diabolism

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(Author and witch Madeleine Le Despencer)

Because I like plugging others’ work as well as my own on this blog, I thought I would share the recent announcement of a forthcoming new book by my favourite Catholic witch Madeleine Le Despencer.

Madeleine’s book Le Catholicisme Noire: The Devotional Blasphemies of Abbé Joseph-Antoine Boullan, which will be published by Three Hands Press towards the end of this year, deals with the life and practices of Abbé Boullan, a 19th century defrocked Roman Catholic priest and Luciferian Gnostic mystic who was accused of Satanism and generated considerable scandal in the occult scenes of fin de siecle France. Continue reading

Embodying Healing: Tantric Ritual Short-hand and the Training of Anthropological Attention

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Elaborate ritual procedures are a hallmark of Indo-Tibetan tantra. Tantric rites are often long and complex. Ceremonies typically involve multiple parts or stages, replete with lengthy chanted liturgies, extensive visualizations and gestures, and the making of both physical and imagined offerings. The ability to memorize such procedures, and to properly and elegantly execute the intricate choreographies of body posture and movement, recited mantras, and imagined forms which they require, is crucial to tantric expertise. Large-scale and extended rituals which involve a lot of people, ritual trappings, and processes are important in Tibetan Buddhist contexts and are conducted frequently. Yet the prevalence of externally elaborate ritual performances should not be taken to mean that smaller, quicker and more ‘internal’ rites are not also a vital part of Tibetan ritual specialists’ work. Continue reading

Magic Without Savages and the Racialization of Ideas

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Given the way history has unfolded, no matter who you might be, it is difficult, if not impossible to talk about magic without talking about time and temporality. Accordingly, then, to speak of magic is to inevitably invoke the lofty spirit-kings of modernity, rationality, and progress. I just started reading Christopher Bracken’s 2007 book ‘Magical Criticism: The Recourse of Savage Philosophy’. Bracken traces the ways Western Enlightenment philosophers and anthropologists have constructed categories of ‘primitive thought’ and how these remain influential today, despite formal disavowals of ethnocentric notions of the savage. He explains his position Continue reading