Tween Tarot, and Announcing a New Card Reading Services Website

 

image2 (3)

(The author of this blog, probably age 11, divining for a client at an outdoor flea-market in South Africa in the late 90s. Clock the middle parting and regrettable dream-catcher necklace – a gift from a friend, honest!)

Readers of this blog who have listened to some of the interviews I have done will know that in addition to my work as a cultural anthropologist I have spent over two decades working as a diviner for clients as well.

I began reading Tarot cards for querents (an old-fashioned word for divination clients) in South Africa when I was about ten years old. My family was not really spiritually inclined at all, and I was raised without religion at home. From very early on, however, I was drawn to religion, and to occult and esoteric matters. From a young age I had a number of dreams, intimations and experiences which fuelled this interest. Although my parents did not have the personal expertise to explain these or to guide me directly, they were thankfully open-minded and accommodating enough to encourage me to do my own research and exploration. My maternal grandmother, who had a passing interest in things like astrology and other forms of divination Continue reading

Learning Hierogylphics and Academic Mentors

learning hieroglyphics

I started asking myself the other morning if I could remember when I really felt like I was going to become an academic. I was a precocious child – I was passionate from a young age about reading and learning, about conducting my own research into specialized subjects that interested me. But I found myself thinking just now about when exactly the point of no return might have been.

I am the son of a (now semi-retired) professional academic. When I was growing up, I would often visit my Dad’s office in the English Department at the University of KwaZulu Natal in Durban, South Africa. My Dad worked for many decades as a professor there, and the university looms large in the city and my snap-shot memories of it. It is a tall, tan building that looks down somewhat imperiously onto the city from atop a small hill. Pushing up from the folds of land surrounding it, it exudes a quiet constancy. Yet despite its classic monastic-fortress on the hill feel, any firmness it might manage is ultimately lost to Durban’s humid haze, and the city’s trademark red sand has coated the building’s stonework altogether too thoroughly for it to maintain any illusion of celestial stateliness – ruddy-cheeked and dusty, the university’s brand of monasticism is less regal abbot, and more older, disheveled but dignified bachelor – tall, skinny and off to one side, a friend of the hosts at the mixer, pulling nervously at his collar. Continue reading

How my Dad got Worms: Academic Karma, and Wondering what Anthropology is even good for

worms and anthropology post

When I was about 12 years old my Dad got worms. He got a lot of them, and it ended up being quite awkward. He didn’t get them in his guts, though, but in a washing machine.

I had forgotten all about this episode in my Dad’s and mine own life until just now, when I was talking to a friend of mine on Facebook, Austin Coppock, about animism and the difference between Continue reading

On Gay Cowboys, Pirates, and Going Fishing

blue pirate.jpg

I just read Annie Proulx’s ‘gay Western’ “Brokeback Mountain” for the first time. I saw the film adaptation with Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal just after it and I, came out ten or more years ago, but had never read the story until now. I’m amazed at how faithful the film is to the story. In both the original and the adaptation, Alma, Ennis/Heath Ledger’s character’s now ex-wife (played by Michelle Williams), confronts Ennis one Thanksgiving in the kitchen about the real purpose of his intermittent fishing trips with his old buddy/secret-not-so-secret-lover Jack Twist/Jake Gyllenhaal. In one of the most poignant parts of the film, Alma says Continue reading